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  1. #1

    Europe psa: i called him morgan

    now on netflix.uk and .de

  2. #2
    Yeah this was the one I was waiting for.
    Yay!

    David

  3. #3
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    "Each heart vibrates to that iron string."
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
    (who obviously played in Carl Kress tuning)

  4. #4
    Just watched it.
    This is my idea of an excellent documentary of not only an important musician, but the honest portrait of the music culture that this music grew and thrived in.
    Interviews with the Heaths, Jymie Merrit, Bennie Maupin and so many more. No fluff or hero worship here, but a real look at a real human being, actually two, who lived their lives fighting and made something extraordinary through music.

    This goes on the top tier of my "best jazz documentaries" list.

    Hey did anybody see that sci fi movie Valarian? Herbie Hancock as the coolest space admiral ever!

    David

  5. #5
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    Watching now.
    "Each heart vibrates to that iron string."
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
    (who obviously played in Carl Kress tuning)

  6. #6
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    More than a jazz documentary... astonishing social snapshot (realism without posture or pose). I found it upsetting. 'Jazz as religion' is no joke.
    "Each heart vibrates to that iron string."
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
    (who obviously played in Carl Kress tuning)

  7. #7
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    Watching again now.

    There's none of the necrology, hand-wringing nor sanitising I'd anticipated - and none of the usual talking heads, either.

    There's just an uncomfortable and cautionary tale.

    (Because blind oblivion to one's addictions doesn't mean one doesn't have some kind of monkey on one's back.)
    Last edited by destinytot; 08-13-2017 at 06:47 AM. Reason: Clarity
    "Each heart vibrates to that iron string."
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
    (who obviously played in Carl Kress tuning)

  8. #8
    Gotta see this, one of my very favorite trumpet players.

    (Was re-listening to Sidewinder the other day, and I didn't realize the piano player is none other than Barry Harris. Barry H. is sometimes seen as a kind of "bebop moldy fig" but his playing is pretty widely based. He did some nice stuff with Yuseef Lateef, another Detroit guy, with world jazz sounds.)

    Anyway, Morgan's tone and phrasing is just outstanding.
    Last edited by goldenwave77; 08-13-2017 at 07:20 AM.

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the heads up (I'm terrible at keeping up with what's on Netflix etc., as most of the stuff doesn't interest me). It's added to my playlist and I can't wait to see this!

  10. #10
    i'll watch it later with my wife. so please no spoilers...
























  11. #11
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    No spoilers - just a trigger alert for the hard of thinking. And that's all I have to say about that.
    "Each heart vibrates to that iron string."
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
    (who obviously played in Carl Kress tuning)

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by destinytot View Post
    No spoilers - just a trigger alert for the hard of thinking. And that's all I have to say about that.
    now i was joking

  13. #13
    I'm still thinking about it. This is so spot on to the jazz world of NY and the sensibilities of the people that got me into the larger jazz experience. There was Miles and what the Columbia machine made him into- and what most people love about the iconic perspective. Then there was Lee Morgan, from a time when Blue Note and that sound chronicled a story of streets and struggle in every solo. And that's all I have to say about that.

    David

  14. #14
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    I'm indifferent to Miles the man, but not to Lee Morgan.

    I think that's what makes this more than a just a 'jazz' documentary for me.

    Because I'm not indifferent to what unfolds, and I wish to see such tragedy averted.

    And I have a lot more to say - and, hopefully, do - about that.
    "Each heart vibrates to that iron string."
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
    (who obviously played in Carl Kress tuning)

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by goldenwave77 View Post
    ... a kind of "bebop moldy fig"
    At first that looked to me like an Orwellian inversion of language - but what now seems odd is that the description actually fits!
    "Each heart vibrates to that iron string."
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
    (who obviously played in Carl Kress tuning)

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by goldenwave77 View Post
    Gotta see this, one of my very favorite trumpet players.

    (Was re-listening to Sidewinder the other day, and I didn't realize the piano player is none other than Barry Harris. Barry H. is sometimes seen as a kind of "bebop moldy fig" but his playing is pretty widely based. He did some nice stuff with Yuseef Lateef, another Detroit guy, with world jazz sounds.)

    Anyway, Morgan's tone and phrasing is just outstanding.
    Was reading Bob Cranshaws interview (bassist on Sidewinder) the other day and he was talking about how Harris adapted his style and played funky on the date.

    Saw it during it's short initial run and loved it, maybe the best jazz doc I've seen. I wasn't going to miss it as Lee's probably in my top 5 fave musicians.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon View Post
    Was reading Bob Cranshaws interview (bassist on Sidewinder) the other day and he was talking about how Harris adapted his style and played funky on the date.

    Saw it during it's short initial run and loved it, maybe the best jazz doc I've seen. I wasn't going to miss it as Lee's probably in my top 5 fave musicians.
    Bob Cranshaw also mentions Barry Harris briefly in the video below. "If Lee really wanted a funky thing, then somebody like Herbie Hancock - who was more into that kind of groove - would have probably been the choice. Although, you know, we were the people who were at the date. Barry said - I'll never forget - Barry said, when he started, he was going to play as funky as he could play. Because he was a bebop player - and they were not into the funky style of the 'Horace-Silver' kind of thing that maybe the tune called for. Barry said, 'Man, I'm going to play as funky as I can on it.' But he had a feeling that the tune... that there was something there. He was the first one to say it, you know."
    "Each heart vibrates to that iron string."
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
    (who obviously played in Carl Kress tuning)

  18. #18
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    psa: i called him morgan

    Yeah a lot of the Barry mouldy fig bebop thing ... I reckon it's an act. He loves to play up to it. And he loves to hold court.

    People who don't get the twinkle in his eye might miss it....

    And then he'll say 'well I guess I like some Stevie Wonder' and play Isn't She Lovely...

    But he is deadly serious about his mission to teach bebop to as many students as he can....
    Last edited by christianm77; 08-13-2017 at 03:30 PM.

  19. #19
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    "Each heart vibrates to that iron string."
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
    (who obviously played in Carl Kress tuning)

  20. #20
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    Saw it last night. Very moving. You're quite right, Destinytot, it is more than 'just' a jazz documentary. I'd rate it up there with "The Jazz Baroness" from a couple of years ago.

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