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  1. #1
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    Chico Pinheiro - Brazilian rhythms for guitar

    Just came online at Home - My Music Masterclass

    Artist:
    Chico Pinheiro
    Length: 33:28 Minutes

    Description: In this “Brazilian Rhythms for Guitar” lesson, master guitarist Chico Pinheiro brings you through various sub-genres of Brazilian music. Chico discusses and demonstrates Bossa Nova, Samba, Samba Funk, Samba Teleco Teco, Baião, Frevo, Ijexá and Partido Alto, so that you can comprehend the nuances of the styles. If you want to learn about Brazilian music from the source, this guitar masterclass is for you. NOTE: There is a PDF bundled with the download version of this video (not the $8.99 streaming version) which includes the embedded notation seen in the video.

    Topics Covered: Guitar, Brazilian Music, Rhythms, Bossa Nova, Samba, Samba Funk, Samba Teleco Teco, Baião, Frevo, Ijexá, Partido Alto, Etc.



    Chico Pinheiro - Guitar Lesson - Brazilian Rhythms
    Last edited by David B; 08-19-2017 at 06:18 AM.

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  2. #2
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    Chico Pinheiro - Brazilian rhythms for guitar

    Nice! Will form a companion piece to my week of ineptly banging Brazilian percussion instruments.

  3. #3
    I haven't bought the video yet, although I will. Chico is the best comping guitarist for groove based music I've ever heard. He is also an absolute master of other aspects of the guitar.

    I'd also recommend Marco Pereira's book Ritmos Brasilieros. This book has dozens of examples of Brasilian styles, each with standard notation and mp3. The material is not simplified in any way. The stuff is challenging to read and, for me, hard to play. The mp3s are done at full speed, so slow downer software may be very helpful. I'd recommend checking out Samba Telecoteco first.

  4. #4
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    Hey rpjazzguitar, you seem to know your Brazilian music... I would say I'm still confused as to the exact difference between the standard Bossa/Samba pattern I play and Partido Alto - which is as follows, and contains the Partido rhythm, which I give as the first example.

    The way the rhythm is expressed in Chico's playing differently in the Partido example, more like the second example.

    Is it the fact that the second note (the 16th off beat) is expressed as a higher sound, also he eliminates that push before beat 2.

    Also I notice that in medium samba, the rhythms seems to be a bit busier than Bossa.

    Actually TBH having written out I think I may have answered my own question lol. Am I rite?

    Chico Pinheiro - Brazilian rhythms for guitar-brazilian-guitar-patterns-1-jpg

  5. #5

  6. #6
    i could not find Ritmos Brasileiros anywhere other than illegally downloading on scribd

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by jzucker View Post
    i could not find Ritmos Brasileiros anywhere other than illegally downloading on scribd
    I had the same problem. I think it is available only in Brazil? Many of the really good books on this music seem to be only available in Brazil (and in Portuguese.)

  8. #8
    [QUOTE=christianm77;800759]Hey rpjazzguitar, you seem to know your Brazilian music... I would say I'm still confused as to the exact difference between the standard Bossa/Samba pattern I play and Partido Alto - which is as follows, and contains the Partido rhythm, which I give as the first example.

    The way the rhythm is expressed in Chico's playing differently in the Partido example, more like the second example.

    Is it the fact that the second note (the 16th off beat) is expressed as a higher sound, also he eliminates that push before beat 2.

    Also I notice that in medium samba, the rhythms seems to be a bit busier than Bossa.

    Actually TBH having written out I think I may have answered my own question lol. Am I rite?

    Chico Pinheiro - Brazilian rhythms for guitar-brazilian-guitar-patterns-1-jpg[/QUOTE

    Hi, Happy to do what I can to help clear this up. Pattern 2 is what I was taught is classic Partido Alto. It's what I hear on Airto's song "Partido Alto". The elements that make it happen are the high tone on the second sixteenth and the four eighth notes in a row - starting on the second beat.

    To put this in context, Partido Alto is a samba variant. So is bossa nova.

    I once asked a Brazilian guitar teacher to teach me the bossa nova pattern. He laughed and said, "every song is different". That's partly what's going on here. Your Pattern 1 is a samba pattern with some similarity to classic Partido Alto, but it's simply a little different. Closer to what might be called a standard samba pattern.

    It seems to me that there is a classic Partido Alto and everybody agrees on it -- and then there are gray areas.

    By the way, there is also reverse Partido Alto, where the second bar is played first, comparable to 2-3 or 3-2 clave.

    As I understand it, both samba and bossa can be played with either one or two bar patterns.

    The samba dancers seem to think about it as a one bar thing (and it's sometimes played that way) Uh One E rest, Uh Two E rest.

    But, samba is more often (at least in jazz) played as a two bar pattern, forward or reverse. Every song is different, but one classic version would be /xo xo xx ox /ox ox ox xo. You'll sometimes hear the tamborim play that, but a good tamborim player changes it constantly..

    Bossa has the classic Joao Gilberto comp which is xo xo ox oo -- one bar pattern. But, it is often played as a two bar pattern as well. xo ox oo xo/ oo xo ox oo/, for example. That's what an American drummer who isn't intimately familiar with Brazilian styles is likely to play.

    And, samba can, and is, played with a similar pattern. The difference is that Bossa is played more softly and, typically with more sophisticated harmony. One Brazilian teacher I know rejects the notion that Bossa is a musical style, instead insisting it's an era, and that the style is slow Samba.

    I'm not sure I can clear it up any more than that. And, there are a lot of other samba variants.

    I'd add this, based on what I've found most difficult about playing this stuff.

    1. The accents are not played exactly as written. If you play the note values mathematically correct with the metronome, it won't groove. There is a frequency spectrum analysis somewhere on the internet that proves it Somebody recorded a good band and plotted the accents on a time line. Does not line up with the metronome.

    2. When a skilled musician plays something as simple as the shaker, you can feel the samba rhythm and it makes you want to dance. But, if a skilled American drummer then picks up the shaker, you're likely to have less of an urge to dance, even though he seems to be doing the same thing. The accents are subtle.

    3. When Chico says to play right in the center of the beat, he's saying something of critical importance. I know what he's doing, I'm not a beginner, I've played with expert bass/drums (who can do it) and I can't get it to feel the same. I'm convinced that the difference is in the precise placement of the accents.

    4. I've have been advised to practice it by playing all the 16ths (in 2/4) evenly, then play them with accents, then play only the accents. When a Brazilian expert does it, that changes every bar and they all groove.

    Hope that's helpful.






    ]

  9. #9
    As far as I know, it's only in Portuguese and only available in Brazil.

    The notation is standard and there are mp3s, so the language barrier is not that big a deal, or so I think.

  10. #10
    Faria's book is terrific. Perhaps the best single guitar book I ever used - in terms of how much useful material I got from it.

    He breaks down the patterns and then illustrates with accurate transcriptions from well known recordings.

  11. #11
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    I second the recommendation for Nelson's book, so much fun. Brazilian voicings and harmonic patterns are just as cool to explore as the rhythms and Nelson's book is a great intro. Comes with a CD as well, so you can hear it. Lots of first inversions, with voice movement that we don't think about as much in the states, if I can make a superficial generalization.

    Aebersold has a brazilian play-along that demos these kinds of harmonies and is great fun (and a challenge) to comp with and solo over.

    I just bought the 6 part Lage download, but Chico's video is next on my list. Love that guy and everything he does, check him out on youtube, both in group settings and in duo settings with his girlfriend. Movie star handsome, sings well, plays amazing and writes incredibly well. His album with Anthony Wilson is a must have, but his own efforts show off his writing skills. I hope he's famous in Brazil, he deserves to be!
    Last edited by yebdox; 09-10-2017 at 12:49 PM.
    It all works out in the end; if it's not working out, it's not the end.

  12. #12
    João Bosco plays the Partido Alto rhythm at the beginning of this song. At 50 sec you can notice the kick drum playing a different pattern, closer to partido, maybe.

    If you don't like the learning process you probably know less than you can.
    https://learningbrazilianguitar.com/

  13. #13
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    Post intro - another anthem:


    Good video on the one above, but there are fewer vocal idiosyncrasies in this audio-only performance:
    Last edited by destinytot; 09-13-2017 at 04:14 AM. Reason: addition
    "Each heart vibrates to that iron string."
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
    (who obviously played in Carl Kress tuning)

  14. #14
    To my ear these last two are not quite the classic Partido Alto pattern, at least, not how I was taught it.

    I think of Partido Alto as having a high, accented tone on the second sixteenth of bar 1 (thinking in 2/4) and the next chord on 2. But, in these videos I also hear the 4th sixteenth and the accent on the 2nd sixteenth is a little less pronounced. So, I think it's closer to straight samba. That said, there are no standard definitions, every song is different, and Bosco is one of the all-time great samba rhythm guitarists.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by rpjazzguitar View Post
    To my ear these last two are not quite the classic Partido Alto pattern, at least, not how I was taught it.

    I think of Partido Alto as having a high, accented tone on the second sixteenth of bar 1 (thinking in 2/4) and the next chord on 2. But, in these videos I also hear the 4th sixteenth and the accent on the 2nd sixteenth is a little less pronounced. So, I think it's closer to straight samba. That said, there are no standard definitions, every song is different, and Bosco is one of the all-time great samba rhythm guitarists.
    Are the lyrics up to scratch?
    "Each heart vibrates to that iron string."
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
    (who obviously played in Carl Kress tuning)

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