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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    UK
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    911

    Silent Guitar Yamaha SL SG200N

    Does anyone have a Yamaha "Silent" guitar?
    i am intrigued by it as a electric nylon strung
    guitar. The downside for me is the 50mm nut
    or on the latest version NW a 52mm nut.
    I fear this could be a problem as I usually
    opt for the standard 42mm on electrics
    as I have small hands. Any opinions /or
    advice welcome,

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
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    Edinburgh
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    3,181
    I played one in Guitar Guitar Edinburgh, Alan, recently. I was impressed at how well built it was, and the sound wasn't bad at all, more jazz than classical I'd say, which might be what you are after.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    Thanks Rob , your assumption is correct,I'm
    just deterred by the nut width , which is
    not a problem for you as you are used to
    the Classical wider nut.


    Alan

  4. #4
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    Apr 2010
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    That's true. I never noticed the nut width.

  5. #5

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2016
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    Hill Country
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    1,605
    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop View Post
    Large nuts can be awkward.
    No problem if you're used to handling them.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Mystic CT
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    1,412
    Nuts are easily replaced with smaller spacing between the strings.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by silverfoxx View Post
    Does anyone have a Yamaha "Silent" guitar?
    i am intrigued by it as a electric nylon strungguitar. The downside for me is the 50mm nut or on the latest version NW a 52mm nut. I fear this could be a problem as I usually opt for the standard 42mm on electrics
    as I have small hands. Any opinions /or advice welcome,
    I have the Aria Sinsonido silent classical guitar, it's probably a bit cheap'n'cheerful compared to the Yamaha but it works ok. But I seem to recall when I bought it, there were 2 versions, one with the normal classical nut width (which I wanted), and one with a narrower nut width more suited for jazz/pop/rock players. So it might be worth investigating whether that model is still available.

    Maybe it's this one?
    Aria AS-101C/SPL Sinsonido Nylon String Guitar - Piano Black Ivor Mairants Music Centre

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop View Post
    I have the Aria Sinsonido silent classical guitar, it's probably a bit cheap'n'cheerful compared to the Yamaha but it works ok. But I seem to recall when I bought it, there were 2 versions, one with the normal classical nut width (which I wanted), and one with a narrower nut width more suited for jazz/pop/rock players. So it might be worth investigating whether that model is still available.

    Maybe it's this one?
    Aria AS-101C/SPL Sinsonido Nylon String Guitar - Piano Black Ivor Mairants Music Centre
    Bear in mind the Yamaha looks more sophisticated (I just checked it out), i.e. built in reverb/chorus, probably a more comfortable frame, a proper head and tuning machines.

    The Aria is also a travel guitar, so the frames are detachable (they are basically tubular with foam padding). It's headless with tuning pegs at the bottom end (like a Steinberger). Like I said, all a bit cheap/basic compared to the Yamaha. But I just wanted something I could practise classical guitar stuff on in the evenings without disturbing anybody, it's good enough for that.

  10. #10
    I have the original silent guitar. The current one is the second model of it, I believe.

    The neck feels great. Even though I prefer a very slim neck, this one felt fine...

    The guitar sounds pretty good, except when you hit it too hard. Then it gets that piezo quacking sound.

    Ricardo Vogt, a great player, toured the world with Eliane Elias playing one, afaik.

    Downsides: There are two reverb settings and one is absolutely drenched. Hopefully, you like the other one.

    The hardware didn't hold up. The connectors loosened and crackle. My guess is they
    are soldered directly into the circuit board, which is a way to guarantee problems after a couple of years. I haven't opened it up to resolder yet, but, eventually, it will have to be done.

    Battery life is short. I have a Godin Multiac in which the batteries last for months. For the Yamaha, it's maybe 10 hours. You have to have an extra battery in your pocket.

    There is a wall wart for it. It hummed a bit when plugged in that way.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Eastern Ontario Canada
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    5
    I own an SLG200n and absolutely love it! I spent years playing only classical stuff though, so my hands are adapted to the larger fret board (actually, I thought it was a little small the first time I played it). If you can get used to it, it is well worth investing in. The sound is great. You can really control the tone with the onboard eq and effect. Plugging into amp or headphones are both very good experiences with this instrument as well.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    www.rwtwguitars.com
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    623
    I think grahambop and Thumpalumpics have identified the problem. Some people handle lots of nuts, and move to new ones with no issues. Their hands just seem to know what to do...

    Ok, enough childishness. However I find the classical neck profile and wider nut so off putting that I actually try to make a guitar that has as close to standard nut and neck profile for a jazz box as possible and still be strung with nylon. Of course mine are not silent/travel guitars and they are priced like a boutique hand made guitar (albeit at the lower end). So I am not suggesting it as an alternative. But if you are not used to a classical neck, I don't think you will be happy with the instrument. I have a lovely classical guitar I bought in the 80's in Spain that I want to love. But the neck keeps me from paying it.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Leeds, UK
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    1,296
    Have you considered the Yamaha NTX series ? They have a slightly narrower nut - 48 mm, which works well for me even though all my other guitars are nearer 43mm. They are not silent - but not as loud as full bodied classical guitar and have a very fine amplified tone. I have the NTX700 and I'm very happy with it.
    Have no secrets, hear no lies.

  14. Quote Originally Posted by silverfoxx View Post
    Does anyone have a Yamaha "Silent" guitar?
    i am intrigued by it as a electric nylon strung
    guitar. The downside for me is the 50mm nut
    or on the latest version NW a 52mm nut.
    I fear this could be a problem as I usually
    opt for the standard 42mm on electrics
    as I have small hands. Any opinions /or
    advice welcome,
    Yamaha "Silent" guitar plays beautifully. It provides superb sound through a PA and is designed with great electronics. I found it really great for players looking for a super-quiet practice instrument.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Spokane, WA
    Posts
    699
    I have both the earlier 100 and the newer 200 SLN, bought the newer one to get the upgraded electronics and slightly narrower neck and it is indeed, slightly easier to play, but not by much. The electronics are an improvement over the earlier model, but again, not by a lot. They both still sound better by playing through my pedal board effects and tweaking the eq on the amp than straight in.

    I have hard tension strings on both, which helps to keep from overloading the piezo with flimsy strings, but in the end, my Godin Multiac SA sounds much, much better and has a way more useful 3 band eq. I bought the yamahas to use as travel guitars and because both Leo Amuedo and Lionel Loueke make theirs sound pretty good, but it takes some processing to get there, in my experience. Love my Godin. Jammed a few tunes with my friend John Stowell at a house concert a couple of weeks ago and he was surprised by the tone of the Godin, "for the price."
    Last edited by yebdox; 07-29-2017 at 02:41 AM.
    It all works out in the end; if it's not working out, it's not the end.

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by yebdox View Post
    I have both the earlier 100 and the newer 200 SLN, bought the newer one to get the upgraded electronics and slightly narrower neck and it is indeed, slightly easier to play, but not by much. The electronics are an improvement over the earlier model, but again, not by a lot. They both still sound better by playing through my pedal board effects and tweaking the eq on the amp than straight in.

    I have hard tension strings on both, which helps to keep from overloading the piezo with flimsy strings, but in the end, my Godin Multiac SA sounds much, much better and has a way more useful 3 band eq. I bought the yamahas to use as travel guitars and because both Leo Amuedo and Lionel Loueke make theirs sound pretty good, but it takes some processing to get there, in my experience. Love my Godin. Jammed a few tunes with my friend John Stowell at a house concert a couple of weeks ago and he was surprised by the tone of the Godin, "for the price."
    The original Yamaha Silent was my first nylon. I stopped using it when I got a Godin Multiac Nylon SA. The Godin didn't have the quack.

    Here are some random observations about the two instruments.

    The Godin is a surprisingly bright sounding guitar. I play it with middle and treble controls all the way down and bass part way up. I often wish I could tame the brightness a little bit more, but there's no way to do that. I checked with RMC. Of course, you can add EQ down the signal chain.

    The Godin fed back at a level of volume you could talk over, if the amp faced the guitar. The howling drove me crazy. OTOH, it was almost as loud as a full body when played acoustically. Eventually, I stuffed the body with upholstery foam. The acoustic sound became muffled, but the electric sound wasn't affected much.

    The Godin's lower bout is short. In the sitting position I prefer, it sometimes falls off my leg. I have to use a strap.

    On the positive side, I had the neck reset to get electric like action. That worked great. It's a fine sounding instrument.

    The original Silent's neck is really good, but the upper bout where it hits the underside of your right arm is uncomfortable. I know another player of it who has jury rigged padding. It's an annoying feature. Perhaps somebody else will tell us if the new model fixed that.

    A feature of the Silent is the aux input and headphone jack. That means you can practice, silently, playing along with a recording. Works great.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Spokane, WA
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    699
    Hey, Roger,

    My Godin is maybe 10 years old, haven't really ever had an issue with feedback, playing at acoustic trio volume, sorry to hear yours misbehaves

    I agree, it's a bright sounding guitar, but dropping the treble and lot and the mids some, and keeping it on the neckward tone switch (mid boost, or whatever they call it) is my favorite setting. I run it mostly through a 40 watt Allen Old Flame through a partially closed back 1x 12 with an EV SRO, my favorite setup.

    As far as the two Silent models, the upper bout on the newer one is pretty much the same. No increase in comfort, really. I like the neck on the Godin much better. But, I consider it a good workout to play different necks and working to play cleanly. I may still lean towards a Sadowsky nylon some time, pretty spendy, but the narrower neck with a likely very good setup is pretty appealing.

    I need to put the older SLN up for sale, as I really only have use for one, although I did try the Loueke setup with a octave-up A string for different voicings. Interesting, but I'm no Lionel
    It all works out in the end; if it's not working out, it's not the end.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Rome, Italy
    Posts
    460
    No idea how wide the nut was on the old Ibanez SC500N.

    Silent Guitar Yamaha SL SG200N-ibanez-sc-series-jpg

  19. #19

    Silent?

    I had a Yamaha Silent nylon - fun for a while, but I eventually sold it.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    578
    Quote Originally Posted by Fidelcaster View Post
    No idea how wide the nut was on the old Ibanez SC500N.

    Silent Guitar Yamaha SL SG200N-ibanez-sc-series-jpg
    I happened upon one of those SC500N's in a small guitar shop during my 25th wedding anniversary trip to Maui. My wife wondered why I didn't buy it since I raved about its tone. The only drawback was the narrow nut.

    All this talk about Yamaha's Silent Guitar has me thinking about buying one. If it's good enough for Lee Ritenour, then it's good enough for my fumble-fingers.

    This Ebay seller has a package deal for anyone interested...

    Yamaha SLG200N Silent Guitar - Tobacco Brown Sunburst COMPLETE GUITAR BUNDLE | eBay

  21. #21
    I had a silent guitar for a while when I was travelling a lot for work. I eventually sold it.

    Pros:
    Playability is great, feels like a legit guitar.
    Super portable: packs down very small
    It's a great guitar for electric, amplified nylon string sound.

    Cons:
    The onboard sound/effects are terrible: I ended up attaching a small zoom effects processor with velcro and using that.
    I found using headphones anytime I wanted to practice to be incredibly demotivating/annoying.
    Battery life wasn't great
    It's pretty fiddly to setup/teardown and that was also demotivating for me.

    Ultimately, for me, I found it a lot more rewarding to work on other musical things when travelling instead of playing guitar. drumsticks+practice pad, arranging + composing, etc. But, that's obviously a personal decision. I've been playing a long time and earlier in my life I definitely would have wanted to get in a couple hours of practice at the hotel or whatever, and the yamaha is a great way to do that.

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